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Tagged ‘gender‘
Queer Lip Syncing

Queer Lip Syncing

The queer community has a long love affair with lip syncing. For some of us, lip syncing has been about gender expression, for some it’s a tongue-in-cheek perversion of mainstream culture. It’s an ordinary and somewhat expected sight at our festivals and parades. And it’s not just the men dressed up as women or the women dressed up as women, or those of us who express androgyny, it’s the women dressed up as men. Drag King style. It shocks me when someone hasn’t heard of Drag Kings before.

This photo is from a Drag King Battle that was held in Melbourne and hosted by the notoriously handsome, Rocco D’Amore. Through the sheer power of crowd persuasion, I won the battle and left with $100 and a trophy in my hand. My song? Set it Off by our own, Timomatic.

I always wanted to do live drag – where I actually sing. Laurie Anderson style. Performance art has a long love affair with gender.

Soul of Sydney

Soul of Sydney

A secret venue only released on the day of, a magic rope that becomes a game of limbo, funk and soul with a sprinkle of disco and a warm, welcoming, non-judgemental, all-colours crowd of dance-lovers – welcome to Soul of Sydney.

I love dancing with people. I love the expression and communication of movement to music. I love the pure joy of being connected to soul. Being invited by another to join them in a wild storm of energy, of sexual expression through dance and of gender play. The crowd parts, a circle is made. The tall muscular man with the ginger beard invites me in. His incredible moves drew the crowd including those hand on the hips Beyonce accents he brings – so wonderful to watch on such a masculine body. I match his every move, my eyes never leaving his, catching, falling, subliming the energy between us. He hugs and thanks me after the final pose with the applause falling around us. Many acknowledgements come my way, but the best comment S’ra tells me, was the man near her who said to his friend as I was dancing, “She’s so hot, she’s making my eyes melt.”

Love

Danica

photo credit: Soul Of Sydney

“I think you’re both genders…”

“I think you’re both genders…”

I’m surrounded by family, gathered in Mum and Dad’s lounge room to view my photos from Thailand to San Francisco. We get to the launch of The Gender Book which I attended at the Center for Sex & Culture, a library large enough to have those cool sliding ladders along the bookshelves and the largest edition of Tom of Finland I’ve ever seen! I joined a table where we each coloured in a world map of all genders from the book. My map and I won a brand new edition of the book to take home. Naturally, the four kids in my family have questions. How did I win? What’s the book about? Go back one, I want to study the map, really study it… What’s gender mean?

The Gender book is about fostering greater understanding of gender in all persons. My audience is wide eyed and ages 4-8 in the front row at Mum and Dad’s and so I start the conversation off with, ‘Well, you know how some people are boys and some people are girls, some people are both genders -‘

My 8 year old nephew interjects, ‘I think you’re both genders.’ I look at him for a brief second, about to explain myself, to say something from my point of view. In a heartbeat, I realise I don’t need to justify or explain anything. The sheer innocence, curiosity, wonder and awe emanating from his face is enough for me to respond with a heartfelt, ‘Thank you.

My sister continues the conversation thoughtfully explaining terms like cis meaning people who match the body they were born into and trans meaning people who are born into one body but are not that. Here my brother in law adds in, ‘I work with a lady who used to be a man. She’s lovely.’ I watch the kids faces as they listen intently. It makes sense. Soon they’re ready for the next lot of photos, something about horse riding down at Big Sur.

If the Gender book exists to extinguish oppression and create safe spaces for gender diverse people and their allies through education, then person by person, family by family, we are fulfilling on that.

www.thegenderbook.com